The Light House®
275 Fifield Terrace
Christchurch
New Zealand
Email wisbell@thelighthouse.co.nz
Phone 64 3 3660508
Freephone 0800wisbell
Fax 64 3 3661000
Dr Wendy Rose Isbell

This webpage gives general advice
For enquiries and appointments, please contact HillMed Health, phone 3388655
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Balance the key: Dr Wendy Rose Isbell says good health is much easier to maintain than to retrieve.

Photo: Carys Monteath

Holistic Health

© The Press
September 2006

Running a lifestyle block or small farm is a whole lot easier when you are in good health. As most people will tell you, some from bitter experience, good health is a whole lot easier to maintain than it is to retrieve.

Dr Wendy Rose Isbell is a strong believer in the maintenance-verses-retrieval method. She is also a strong believer in using holistic approach to health, using her considerable experience in conventional and alternative methods to achieve results for her considerable and loyal patient list.

"You can't take good health for granted," says Isbell. "It is the underpinning of your work, family and leisure activities and provides you with the energy to be enthusiastic about what you do."

Isbell says that although the body is forgiving and has amazing powers of regeneration, there is a limit to what it can tolerate. "People need to pay attention to any illnesses or injuries, and make the most of their health options. Keeping your body in good shape obviously helps." Part of looking after yourself, says Isbell, is to relax.

"It may seem easy to say, but often it's easier to do than people think. Relax by doing what you love. Think about what makes your heart sing and make sure that you do that regularly. Maybe those things can be part of your working life, or something totally separate from your everyday activity. Whatever it is, you need to make time for it." One of the reasons many people give for moving from a city to a rural environment is to have more quality time with friends and family. Sometimes the reality is that they are busier than ever and that priority becomes a distant dream. "Don't let it", urges Isbell. "Our family and friends are our connection to the real world of love and companionship, as opposed to the world we live in when we are acting out of fear or anxiety. Close relationships protect us against ill health, early death, poor rehabilitation after illness or accidents, and depression and other mental illness."

In a world where technology has meant we can produce almost instant anything, including communication, the rat race of trying to respond to that increased demand and keep our competitive edge can seem overwhelming.

"It's good to set goals," says Isbell. "But it's even more important to make sure you set them in all areas of your life so you have balance. There are advantages of just being in the flow. No-one is designed to keep up a relentless pace of achievement."

Isbell says that there's a difference between hard work and giving your self a hard life. "There's nothing wrong with hard work. It challenges, motivates and energises us, and gives us a sense of self-worth and achievement. We need to feel physically and mentally tired to enjoy our times of relaxation. Just remember, work is the solution, not the problem."

As a medical specialist and general practitioner who has a special interest in health promotion and disease prevention, Isbell offers medical assessments and ongoing management of medical and psychological illnesses.

Her ability to also offer alternative treatment options, including meditation courses, means her patients can have the best of both medical and alternative treatments tailored to their needs. Since setting up her own practice some 20 years ago, Isbell has developed a formidable reputation for promoting the wellness of the individual. As a member of Pegasus Health, Isbell can also provide her patients all the additional benefits provided by Pegasus Health, as well as the new subsidies.

Perhaps the best thing about Isbell's practice, for the medical phobic, is that it is based in the most unlikely looking doctor's rooms at The Light House on Bealey Avenue.

Awash with colour, comfort and decorated with considerable flair and fascinating objects d'art, you will find you won't need to take a magazine to read while you are in the waiting room. The surroundings alone will keep you completely mesmerised.


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